Saturday | August 19, 2017

John Hall was born in the Canadian West in the early 1920s.  He grew up against the backdrop of the Great Depression, though he said he was lucky to have been sheltered from the toughest times.  With his brother he made his way to western Ontario, riding the rails and working the ports of Lake Superior.  While his brother stayed and worked the mines, John finished school and joined the armed forces in Toronto, eventually landing in the First Hussars.  After training he boarded the Queen Elizabeth troopship and headed to Britain, where he spent time in Aldershot, completing his tank crew training.  John became a radio operator and main gun loader and a member of a Sherman tank crew.  John went ashore in France a few weeks after D-Day and the liberation of Caen, and he saw his early action in Falaise and the ensuing Battle of Normandy.  From there he moved through Belgium and the Netherlands, where he has fond memories of the civilians greeting the troops.  When the war concluded, John returned to Canada and built a life for himself.

We met John at the Sunnybrook Veterans Wing in July 2017, when he was interviewed by Crestwood students Arielle Meyer and Samara Black.

August 9th, 2017

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Marie Broere was born in 1926 in Rotterdam. As a teenager, Marie witnessed the Rotterdam Blitz of 1940. Marie remembers her daily life, living under the German occupation of Holland. She remembers her father being taken from the streets by German soldiers, and managing to escape and return with his family. Being the eldest child in her family, and wanting to help her family through the severe conditions of the Hunger Winter, Marie went to stay with her grandmother, where she worked on a farm in Lekkerkerk until the end of the war. Marie witnessed the liberation of the Netherlands, and in 1958 she immigrated to Canada with her husband and two children.

We met Marie Broere in April 2017 at the Castle Peak Retirement Suites in Bracebridge, where she presently lives.  Marie is one of several authors/editors who assembled At Your Age, a collection of stories of those who live there.  The residents felt it was important for them to record their stories, which serve as a great entry point into their generation’s collective experiences.

May 25th, 2017

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Jack Lewis was born in Montreal in 1925, the youngest in a family where both parents were war veterans.  His father was a doctor, and his mother was a nurse, and they’d met in the battlefield hospital near Boulogne.  They spent much of the Great War in that one location, and Jack remembers that in his war, he passed through that area in about an hour.  Growing up in Montreal, Jack was insulated from the tough economic times of the 1930s, and he remembers a vibrant city where he and his friends enjoyed all that life offered.  With the coming of the war, Jack’s ambition was to enter the air force, but his eyesight denied him this opportunity, and he ended up in the army.  He was selected for an artillery unit, and circumstance saw his unit, part of Canada’s 3rd Division, selected for Operation Overlord, or D-Day.  Jack recalls the preliminary bombardment, and the tragedy of a downed Spitfire, before going ashore in his LST in the third wave.  Juno was taken by then, so he and his unit provided support to the infantry ahead of them, moving past Caen and Falaise, and then into Belgium and the Netherlands.  It was there that Jack’s war ended; he spent some time in the army of occupation before heading back to Canada, where he settled into the rhythm of postwar life.

Jack was interviewed for this project in his home in March 2017, by his daughter Suzie and Scott Masters.

March 31st, 2017

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Bill Tymchuk was born in Ukraine, when it was under Polish control; he went to school there  for 2 years and immigrated to Canada in 1930 (his father had settled down in Canada in 1928). His family was on the farm, and he started school and learned English quickly. Later his family went to Stayner, Ontario and bought a farm there. His family couldn’t afford to send him to high school, so he went to work at the age of 16.

Bill was raised in the shadow of the Great Depression, the rise of Nazis, and he later became a soldier fighting for Canada against Germany on the battlefields of Europe.  Bill was keen to join the Canadian army, and to fight in the war as a Canadian soldier in the Lake Superior Scottish Regiment. He is proud to be a Canadian, and he chose to fight for the country he called his home land. Once overseas Bill spent time in Britain, then he went across the channel, to fight in the Battle of Normandy.  From there he went on to liberate both Belgium and the Netherlands, where he remained in occupation after the war.  Before Canada, he returned to Britain, where he married – then it was back to Canada, where he became a bricklayer in Toronto’s postwar construction boom.

We met Bill at the Legion Branch 75 in October 2016, where he was interviewed by Lyndsay McCulloch, David Huang and Robert McHale.

October 17th, 2016

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Reny Friedman is a child survivor from the Netherlands.  She and her twin brother were born in 1937, just as prewar tensions were building up.  Reny’s mother was from germany, and sensing what was to come, she looked for ways to protect her family.  The family managed to secure the help of the underground, going into hiding in the countryside, in the Ardennes region, as well as in Brussels.  In both cases they were discovered and forced to run, but not all family members escaped.  Reny’s mother was deported to Auschwitz, where she was able to survive the brutality of slave labour at the hands of the Nazis.  She returned at the end of the war, and Reny poignantly described her mother’s emotional state in the months and years after the war.  Reny’s father knew he had to get his children to safety when his wife was taken away, so her turned to the underground, who took Reny’s brother to a monastery and Reny to a convent.  Reny passed the remainder of the war there, where she learned how to live in this new, alien environment.  As time passed, she began to enjoy the rituals and trappings of the Catholic faith.  When her father came to get her at the end of the war, Reny remembers that he allowed her time and was patient with her return to her Jewish roots.  Reny made her way to Canada in the 1950s, where she married Henry Friedman, also a Holocaust Survivor, whose story appears in this project as well.  Reny was interviewed in her home in July 2016 by Scott Masters and Savannah Yutman.

August 24th, 2016

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Leonard Vis was born in Amsterdam, Holland, in 1930. After the Germans occupied the Netherlands, his family went into hiding. They all survived and were liberated in 1945. Leonard After the war, Leonard served two years in the Dutch Army before moving to New York. In 1967, Leonard came to Canada for a job posting.  Leonard came to visit us at Crestwood early in 2016.  He was interviewed for this project by Marina Nevison and Aren Karshafian, along with students from Mr. Masters’ Grade 12 history class.

April 4th, 2016

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The Crestwood Oral History Project is in the midst of its busy season! The CHCs are completing their oral history interviews – all 80+ of them. In the last week, we have had 2 in class visitors, and done one in home visit. Students from Mr. Masters’ class went to visit Kelman Cohen in his home last week; Mr. Cohen is a Canadian army veteran who went overseas as a replacement soldier in 1944. He told Hartley Gelkopf (whose father is Kelman’s doctor), Harlan Rich, Willa Easton and Rory Peckham some unbelievable stories, first about growing up in prewar Toronto, and then about the experiences he survived in the Netherlands. The next day Israel Glassman – another patient of Dr. Gelkopf – came to Crestwood to share his stories with a large group of Grade 10s. Mr. Glassman served in the navy during WW2, doing trans-Atlantic convoy runs and D-Day support missions in the English Channel. Both men were able to add to the students’ understanding of the war, and to give them an emotional connection to events that shaped Canada 70 years ago. This week Pinchas Gutter came to Crestwood; Pinchas is a survivor of the Holocaust from Poland. He is a renowned speaker who has lectured extensively around the world, and he was chosen by the Shoah Foundation for the holographic initiative – please click here for his appearance on the Today show. Crestwood students were lucky to meet Pinchas in person and to hear how he survived. Stay tuned for an update on our visit to Baycrest!

Israel Glassman during his WW2 Service Israel Glassman in Room 203 Pinchas Gutter in Room 203 Pinchas Gutter with students from Grade 10 History Pinchas with Hartley and Jakob Sahar and Pinchas Sunny Liu with Israel Glassman Kelman Cohen on the battlefield Kelman with Rory, Harlan, Hartley and Willa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 19th, 2016

Posted In: Crestwood News, Upper School

The Social Studies Department had some exciting visitors this week, creating great opportunities for students interested in Canada’s military history. On Monday, January 25th, five officers from the Canadian Forces College visited Crestwood, sharing their experiences in Canada’s recent overseas missions, notably Afghanistan. Majors Dennis, Lajeunesse, Harvey, Dias and Barker represented all facets of the military and all spoke eloquently about serving Canada overseas.

Then on Tuesday, January 26th, many of the Canadian History 10 students were lucky enough to have Lorne Winer visit their class. Mr. Winer is a Jewish Canadian veteran of World War Two who recently turned 98. Mr. Winer spoke of his time in Europe, from being stationed in England to being involved in the liberation of France and the Netherlands. Other Crestwood students will soon be doing their own interviews, when we visit Sunnybrook and Baycrest – stay tuned!

IMG_0240 IMG_0243 IMG_0247 IMG_0248 IMG_0251 Major Barker with Major Harvey with Major Lajeunesse with Major Scott Dennis with

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 29th, 2016

Posted In: Crestwood News, Upper School

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Leonard Vis with Ms. Winograd's English 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

This week Crestwood was visited by Hedy Bohm and Leonard Vis, who spoke to Ms. Young and Mrs. Winograd’s respective grade 8 classes about their experiences during the Holocaust. The grade 8 classes have been studying the novel The Boy in the Striped Pajamas, and discussing the social and historical frameworks surrounding the Holocaust. While Hedy is a survivor of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, Leonard is a hidden child survivor. Both Hedy and Leonard’s emotional stories are likely to remain with the students for their entire lives.

Hedy Bohm grew up in pre war Romania, in a region that later came under Hungarian control. As the war escalated, she and her family increasingly came under the influence of the Nazis, and the family was deported to Auschwitz in the summer of 1944. Hedy was able to survive Auschwitz-Birkenau for three months; at that time she was relocated to a work camp, where she spent the remainder of the war as a forced labourer, producing military equipment for the Germans. After liberation by American troops, Hedy went home, where she was able to meet up with cousins, and where she married her husband, Imre. They were able to escape to Prague, where an aid organization arranged for this group of Hungarian orphans to get visas to Canada, where she arrived in 1948.

More recently, Hedy Bohm travelled to Germany from Canada to testify at the trial of Oskar Gröning, a 93-year-old former SS guard known as the “bookkeeper of Auschwitz”, who stands accused of 300,000 separate counts of accessory to murder. Last April, she testified as a witness about her Auschwitz experience. She was one of some 60 Holocaust survivors or their relatives from the U.S., Canada, Israel, and elsewhere who joined the prosecution as co-plaintiffs.

Leonard Vis was born in 1930, in Amsterdam, Netherlands, into a traditional upper- middle-class Orthodox household; with a family tree going back to before the French Revolution.

After the attack on the Netherlands by Germany, in 1940, the family thought it prudent to move to a smaller town, Bussum, some 25 kilometers from Amsterdam.  Discrimination against the Jews started almost at once. In August 1941, Leonard was forced to change to a separate school, staffed exclusively by Jewish teachers. In May 1942, there follow the prescribed wearing of the yellow star, and in June 1942, the family was forced to resettle in Amsterdam.  With the help of some family friends, Leonard was able to go into hiding in August 1942.  His brother and sister had gone before him in July. His parents followed, a week later, when raids and round-ups of Jews became an almost daily occurrence in the city.

When the Netherlands was liberated by Canadian forces in May 1945, the whole family had, thankfully, survived the war. There remained very few families intact in Holland, where more than 80% of the Jewish population had perished at the hands of the Germans and their antisemitic helpers.

We are so thankful to both Hedy Bohm and Leonard Vis for taking the time to share their courageous stories with us.

January 8th, 2016

Posted In: Crestwood News, Upper School

Bill Millhausen was born on January 10, 1918 in Moose Jaw Saskatchewan.  He went to university, where he studied math and engineering and this led him on his World War Two path.  He became an engineer who built bridges in the war.  He was recruited by the head of CN rail, a World War 1 veteran.  Bill’s brother joined the Winnipeg Rifles band and was later put into a mortar team.  Bill was trained in Petawawa at one of the top engineer training centers and then sent to teach other people how build and demolish military items . After that he was sent on the Orion to Farnborough in England where he then traveled to various places in England and continued training. Bill was also sent to Italy, where he narrowly missed the battle of Ortona.  He was then sent all over Italy building bridges,  and rebuilding communities. After Italy he was sent to the Netherlands to be involved in its liberation.

We met Bill at Chartwell in September 2015, when he was interviewed for this project by Alexander McLeod, Will Paisly and Navid Sarshar.

 

November 6th, 2015

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Jim Shontaler was born in the Canadian west, growing up in the difficult days of the Great Depression.  As there were some family problems, Jim spent many of his early years in an orphanage.  With the war underway and with no firm direction before him, he joined up as soon as he was able, heading off to training and then overseas.  Jim headed first to north Africa and Italy, to begin his “baptism under fire”.  He were in the thick of it, right away, fighting through the defensive lines in Italy, where he was wounded.  From there his unit was shipped north, and they participated in the liberation of France, Belgium, and especially the Netherlands, where Jim had many good experiencess.  Jim’s memories of those times are clear, and his stories are ideal for Canadians looking to find insights in the minds of young Canadian men in the 1940s.

We met Jim in his room at the Sunnybrook Veterans Wing, where he was interviewed for this project in April 2015.

May 12th, 2015

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Sydney Lang was born in Montreal on February 7th, 1923.  He currently resides in Toronto and is 92 years of age.  Sydney grew up during the Great Depression, in the city of Montreal.  He attended public school and was a Canadiens fan.  When the war broke out, Sydney was originally denied from the army because of health reasons, but he was later admitted after a change in policy.  After training and the troopship, Sydney was stationed in England, where pre-invasion preparations were underway.  Once D-Day occurred he was shipped to France, where at one time he found himself behind enemy lines.  Barely escaping with his life, Sydney was reassigned to the second echelon, and he played a rearguard role, including during the liberation of the Netherlands.  With the war over, he returned to Canada and went back to work.
Sydney was interviewed for this project in February 2015 by his neighbours Daven Siu and Victor Xie.  In July 2016 Daven returned with Mr. Masters for a second visit.

April 20th, 2015

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Jack Martin is from Toronto.  He grew up the city’s east end, dealing with the realities of the Great Depression.  From a military family, Jack was in it from the beginning; he enlisted in the Queen’s Own Rifles, and set about training.  A training accident left him deaf in one ear, but as his officer noted, he could hear out of the other one…Jack remembered that officer’s words:  “Send him over!”  Jack spent much of the war in England, serving on the south coast and training for the inevitable invasion.  When the time came, Jack’s unit went over in the first wave, hitting Juno Beach just after the rifle companies.  They set up their mortars just off the beach and were instantly in the thick of it, fighting their way through Normandy and into Caen.  Jack saw a lot of suffering and death, but the Canadians managed to push through, liberating the people of France and the Netherlands.
Jack Martin was interviewed for this project in April 2015;  Mr. Masters had the privilege of seeing Jack in his room at Sunnybrook.

April 19th, 2015

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Alan Forster was born in Toronto, growing up in the city’s east end during the Great Depression.  From a military family, he joined up as soon as he was able, heading off to training and then to England.  Shortly after the D-Day invasion, Alan headed to France, to begin his “baptism under fire”.  They were in the thick of it, right away, fighting through Normandy and into Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany itself.  Alan’s memories of those times are clear, and his stories are ideal for Canadians looking to find insights in the minds of young Canadian men in the 1940s.

We met Alan in his room at the Sunnybrook Veterans Wing, where he was interviewed for this project in April 2015.

March 31st, 2015

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Michael Boyer is a veteran born in Toronto, into a big family.  Fairly well-to-do, Mr. Boyer and his family were less affected by the depression than many. He joined the army at a young age and became part of the Fourth Field Royal Canadian Artillery. Travelling to Europe, Mr. Boyer fought along allied forces such as the British 8th Brigade in battles that eventually liberated the Netherlands and defeated Germany. After the war, he returned to Canada to attend University.

The interview with Mr. Boyer was done at Sunnybrook Hospital in January 2015 by Crestwood students Steven Feng, Guanghao Chen, and Owen Salter.

February 16th, 2015

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Frank Mendham was born in Toronto in 1924; like many his age he grew up against the backdrop of the Great Depression, dealing with the realities of day-to-day life.  When the war came, Frank went into the cavalry, like his father before him.  By the time of the Second World War, tanks had replaced horses.  Frank spent time in England before heading over to France on D-Day; from Normandy, he and his regiment made their way through France and the Netherlands, into Germany.

We visited Frank at the Sunnybrook veterans’ Wing on February 27, 2014, where he was interviewed by Crestwood students Ahmed Izzeldin, Simon Yuan, and Jacob Gurdzy.

April 16th, 2014

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John Hishon and his mother lived in the Yonge & Bloor area of Toronto, where his Mom worked extremely hard to make a living during the Great Depression..  When the war broke out, John trained on the Canadian Exhibition grounds, where at first they did not have any equipment and were laughed at.  He eventually was shipped to England, where he saw firsthand the Battle of Britain.  His squadron was wiped out at Dieppe, but John was lucky to escape this tragic event because he was injured at the time.  He was sent to France after D-Day and was involved  in the attack on Caen on the fourth of July, 1944.  He advanced with the Canadian army in northwestern Europe, through belgium and Netherlands, through to VE Day.  We met Mr. Hishon at the Sunnybrook Veterans’ Wing in November 2013, where he was interviewed by Steven Feng and Hunter Kell.

January 3rd, 2014

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Leah Segalowitz survived the Nazi invasion and occupation of the Netherlands. She went into hiding, working as a nurse, though she was an active member of the Dutch Resistance. When the war concluded, she emigrated to Palestine, spending a number of years in British detention camps and working in a hospital in Cyprus before arriving in Israel in 1948. She and her husband began their lives together there but emigrated to Canada in 1955, where they raised a family.

Leah was interviewed at Baycrest’s Cafe Europa by Crestwood students Alice Lee and Helia Laridashti in Fenruary 2011.

July 9th, 2012

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Lorne Winer first visited Crestwood in February 2012, at the age of 95. He sat down with Canadian History 10 students Maxime Bernier and Nathan George, and told them about his life both before and after the war. Lorne grew up in Toronto, where he remembered life in the Ward during the depths of Depression. He enlisted shortly after the war broke out; after training and an overseas journey that he characterized as utterly miserable, he ended up in England, where he prepared for the D-Day landings. Once the regiment crossed the Channel, Lorne fought his way through Normandy, and into Belgium and the Netherlands, where he had fond memories of the Dutch people. In May 2015, Lorne was featured in a Toronto Star article on the Oral History Project Breakfast, and Mr. Masters did a follow-up interview with him, which is featured here, along with footage from class presentations that were delivered in January 2016 and February 2017, shortly after Lorne had turned 99.  Lorne brought many personal insights and stories to this interview, and we thank Historica Dominion for their part in bringing him to Crestwood.

July 9th, 2012

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Gunter Sander grew up in Germany in the 1930s. Like virtually all German teenagers of the time he joined the Hitler Youth and later became a part of the national work force. When he was brought into the military, he was initially sent to guard islands off the coast of the Netherlands, against a potential invasion by sea. From there he was able to enlist in the Luftwaffe, and training became a big part of his life in the middle war years. But young man that he was, Gunter did not follow all the rules, and a fly-over of his home town did not sit well with his commanding officer, and Gunter was sent to jail and dismissed from the Luftwaffe. He was later released into the infantry and sent to the western front, where he was taken as a POW by British and American forces and sent to a prison camp. There his longtime love of music came to the fore, and this became a key part of the life he would eventually pursue.

Gunter was interviewed for this project by a group of senior history students in January 2012.

July 9th, 2012

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Mr. Lloyd Queen served in the Canadian Army during the war. After training, he was commissioned as a ieutenant and sent to England. He went ashore in the first wave of the Normandy invasion and was in France for about a month before being deployed to the Netherlands and the Battle of the Scheldt. He did cross the Rhine into Germany before being returned to Britain, where he was decorated by King George VI. We visited Mr. Lloyd Queen at the Sunnybrook Veterans’ Wing in October 2008, where Crestwood student Eric Lee interviewed him in his room. He was also interviewed by Gr. 9 student Nick Andreoli in March 2009.

July 9th, 2012

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Jack Newman served in the Canadian Armed Forces during the war. After signing up, he was at Manning Depot at the Ex, followed by training at Brantford and Petawawa. He was assigned to the 4th Battery, 3rd Anti-Tank Regiment and shipped off to England. After time in Aldershot, he was sent with his regiment to Italy, where they battled their way up the Adriatic Coast, seeing action in Ortona. Attached to the British 8th Army, he found himself along the Americans at Anzio, where he participated in the Montecassino offensive. Finally, he was sent to the Netherlands to aid in the liberation of that country as the war concluded.

We met Jack at the Mount Dennis Legion in Toronto, where he was interviewed by Crestwood students Bryan Chung and Alex Ross.

July 9th, 2012

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Larry Levy served in the Canadian Army in northern Europe during the war. After enlisting, training, and the overseas journey, Larry went ashore at Normandy and fought his way through northern France, Belgium, and the Netherlands. Larry served with Signal Corps, and it was his task to locate enemy artillery. Larry brought many personal insights and mementoes to his February 2012 interview, where he sat down with students Alex Galperin, Natasha Hare, and Brandon Deeb. Larry returned in March 2013, this time with Daniel Henareh, Nasir Jamali, Saeed Foodazi, and Henry Lui.  Larry is a great raconteur, and we are thankful to Historica Dominion for introducing him to us.

July 9th, 2012

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Murray Jacobs grew up in prewar Toronto, where he saw some of the city’s growing pains in the 1930s. That included the infamous Christie Pitts Riots of the 1930s, in which he was involved and was forced to confront the reality of local anti-Semitism. He enlisted in World War Two, where he would serve in the engineering battalions. He was sent overseas and eventually went ashore at Juno Beach in the week after D-Day. His regiment fought through Normandy, the Netherland, and into Germany. Murray has since visted the Netherlands, where he is a proud member of Canada’s army of liberation. Today he continues to involve himself in the Royal Canadian Legion and the Memory Project. He was interviewed for this project by Matt D’Ambrosio and Brian Schwartz.

July 9th, 2012

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Vic Henderson was a tank man in the war. he went ashore in France on D-Day + 7 and fought through Normandy, the Netherlands, and into Germany. We met him in the Brookbanks neighbourhood, and he was kind enough to share his memories with Crestwood student John Shahidi.

July 9th, 2012

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Norman Gulko served in the Canadian army in World War Two, where he saw action on several fronts. After training and the overseas journey, he was deployed to Italy. When that campaign was nearing its conclusion, he was sent to the Netherlands, where he fought through northern Europe and into Germany itself. Norman brought many personal insights about his wartime experiences to Brandon Chow, Katherine Charness, and Daniel Sugar, who interviewed him at the Sunnybrook Veterans’ residence in November 2011.

July 9th, 2012

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Ed Forsyth is a Canadian veteran of WW2, having fought his way through France, the Netherlands, and Germany. We met Ed through the Royal Canadian Legion, where he is a proud member of the Brigadier O.M.Martin Branch at Peard Road. Ed is one of many members at that branch who have taken part in this project. Ed is also working hard to preserve memory too, as he is presently working hard to develop a Wall of Names, where the names of all Canadian soldiers killed in overseas conflicts will be featured.

Ed was interviewed for this project by Mr. Masters in April 2012.

July 9th, 2012

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Jan De Vries was 18 years old when he decided to enter the war. He joined the army and passed basic training, choosing to enlist in the paratrooper – or Para – battalion. He went overseas in 1943; in England the Paras continued their training.

On June 5, 1944 the men got up and prepared the parachutes for D-Day. It was still stormy and they were surprised that they were sent off. De Vries was in one of the first Para battalions to land. He had to go in to capture a field, knock out a German headquarters, blow a bridge and protect the field so the rest of the troops could come in. Chaos reigned the first night, but he did achieve his objective, going on to fight his way through Normandy, the Netherlands, and into Germany. Jan is an Order of Canada recipient and we are very pleased to have hosted him at Crestwood.

July 9th, 2012

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Ev Bluestein served in the American Army during WW2, specifically General Patton’s armoured corps. When they made their breakout from the Battle of Normandy, Ev and his comrades fought through France and into the Netherlands and Germany, helping to bring the European war to its conclusion. Ev came to us courtesy of Len Levy, a longtime contributor to Crestwood’s Oral History project. Ev spoke to Mr. Masters’ American History class in March 2011.

July 9th, 2012

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The Southern Ontario Model United Nations Assembly (SOMA) is a student forum for the debate of international issues modeled on the UN itself. It is student-run and has been held for 40 years on the University of Toronto campus and it attracts hundreds of high school students from all over the U.S. and Canada. Students are given the opportunity to represent delegations from the UN itself and to role play/debate as would representatives from those nations. This year 9 students from Crestwood represented the nations of Lebanon, the Netherlands, and Sri Lanka and took part in proceedings on the Security Council, the EU and other parts of this model UN assembly. SOMA is a great way for motivated, interested, and outgoing students to become involved in an enjoyable and demanding extracurricular activity. This year’s team included Lisette Weinstein, Richard Laramie, Kee Mennell, Adam Wilson, Karan Atri, Mark Shafarenko, Michael Lawee, Noah Levin, and was led by Jonah Elfassy, and Staff Advisers Mr. Masters and Mr. Rachlis, all of whom oversaw yet another successful venture in diplomacy

June 28th, 2012

Posted In: Crestwood News, Uncategorized, United Nations